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Jaguar Seeks to Block U.S. Imports of Porsche, Audi SUVs
Christopher Yasiejko and Susan Decker

(Bloomberg) -- You wouldn’t know it was about Jags and Lambos, to judge by its rather dry name: In the Matter of Certain Vehicle Control Systems. But that’s the complaint Jaguar Land Rover Automotive Plc filed on Thursday to block U.S. imports of Porsche, Lamborghini, Audi and Volkswagen sport utility vehicles it says are using its patented Terrain Response technology without permission.

Jaguar Land Rover, a British carmaker owned by India’s Tata Motors Ltd., said in its filing with the U.S. International Trade Commission that the technology helps negotiate a “broad range of surfaces” and is a key feature in Jaguar’s F-Pace and Land Rover Discovery vehicles.

“JLR seeks to protect itself and its United States operations from companies that have injected infringing products into the U.S. market that incorporate, without any license from JLR, technology developed by JLR and protected by its patent,” Jaguar’s lawyer, Matthew Moore, said in the filing.

Representatives of Volkswagen didn’t immediately respond to emails seeking comment on the complaint.

Jaguar wants to block imports of Porsche’s Cayenne; Lamborghini’s Urus; Audi’s Q8, Q7, Q5, A6 Allroad and e-tron vehicles; and VW’s Tiguan vehicles. It said there are plenty of other luxury midsize SUV and compact crossover vehicles to meet consumer demand if the SUVs are banned from the U.S.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/com...f-porsche-audi-suvs/ar-BB1bblQf?ocid=msedgdhp
 

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LOL?!

I hope they have a real good technical basis for this because on its face it seems nothing more than petty.
 

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Here's the Terrain Response patent if anyone is interested.

https://patentimages.storage.googleapis.com/21/9d/1e/2db9443e0d5b06/USRE46828.pdf

It's pretty beefy, but I'm guessing claim 14 is the sticking point. I'm not a lawyer; best I can tell it protects a terrain mode selector which is also adaptive to how the driver drives the car in each mode.
I didn't spend that much time looking at it, but wouldn't the one in the Ford Explorer, or higher Trimmed Jeep Grand Cherokees be subject to the same thing?
 

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I didn't spend that much time looking at it, but wouldn't the one in the Ford Explorer, or higher Trimmed Jeep Grand Cherokees be subject to the same thing?
Had the same thought, did notice Claim 15 . "15. The method claimed in claim 14 , wherein at least one of the driving modes is a rock crawl mode." Now in my SQ5 I recall having an off road setting, don't recall seeing a "rock crawl mode".
 

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I didn't spend that much time looking at it, but wouldn't the one in the Ford Explorer, or higher Trimmed Jeep Grand Cherokees be subject to the same thing?
Or the Golf R, F150, Focus RS, etc etc etc.
Also, the patent originally dates to 2003, that's right around when VW/Porsche launched the Touareg and Cayenne. They had some fancy stuff that changed the throttle response and had various settings.
Maybe Tata forgot about this? Odd that they'd wait nearly 2 decades and only target VW.

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Maybe Tata forgot about this? Odd that they'd wait nearly 2 decades and only target VW.

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Tata didn't own JLR or the patent in 2003. I'm not a lawyer (I still have a soul), but I'm an engineer with a couple of patents. This is a game companies play. Tata will claim they want to prevent import (which is a possible outcome if this went to court I think), but more likely the Tata an VAG lawyers will go back and forth for a while and VAG will pay Tata some money or negotiate a license deal or agree to swap access to patents.
 

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[spoon said:
;114848683]
I didn't spend that much time looking at it, but wouldn't the one in the Ford Explorer, or higher Trimmed Jeep Grand Cherokees be subject to the same thing?
Or the Golf R, F150, Focus RS, etc etc etc.
Also, the patent originally dates to 2003, that's right around when VW/Porsche launched the Touareg and Cayenne. They had some fancy stuff that changed the throttle response and had various settings.
Maybe Tata forgot about this? Odd that they'd wait nearly 2 decades and only target VW.

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The hot hatches you listed have drive modes but that’s not the same as a terrain management system.

And the Touareg never had that in the first or second gen. Just two knobs for air suspension and lockers.

The terrain management system debuted in the 2010 Range Rover and then got ripped off by a ton including Jeep and Ford to start.

Not sure why they don’t go after those two instead of vag. Unless it’s a European thing in which they can only block the exports. Which is strange anyway since the tig comes from Mexico for the us. Not eu.
 

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I didn't spend that much time looking at it, but wouldn't the one in the Ford Explorer, or higher Trimmed Jeep Grand Cherokees be subject to the same thing?
Method patents are typically protecting the process used as opposed to the functionality, so those mode selectors would need to be using the same steps as Jaguar to infringe. No idea how any of these are implemented in software, and anyway Ford, Jeep, BMW, etc. should all be safe from this type of action in particular, because their mode selector SUVs aren't imported.

Again, not a lawyer and this is conjecture. :beer:
 

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Unrelated to this, but in case any your aspiring engineers are reading this post....top IP attorneys make $750-800/hr! Their paralegals bill at $300/hr. If you have a technical background (mechanical, chemical, etc.) and can stomach law, it's not a bad way to go.

Ok, now back to arguing if JLR was better or worse before TATA ownership.
 

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Method patents are typically protecting the process used as opposed to the functionality, so those mode selectors would need to be using the same steps as Jaguar to infringe. No idea how any of these are implemented in software, and anyway Ford, Jeep, BMW, etc. should all be safe from this type of action in particular, because their mode selector SUVs aren't imported.

Again, not a lawyer and this is conjecture. :beer:
I'm like you in that I'm an engineer with a few patents. My understanding is also that even if a patent has been granted, under further scrutiny in court, it might not hold up. So maybe VAG decides to call them on it and see, assuming their attorneys feel they have just cause.
 

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Unrelated to this, but in case any your aspiring engineers are reading this post....top IP attorneys make $750-800/hr! Their paralegals bill at $300/hr. If you have a technical background (mechanical, chemical, etc.) and can stomach law, it's not a bad way to go.

Ok, now back to arguing if JLR was better or worse before TATA ownership.
I'm sure I am generalizing here, but I've known several lawyers who all told me not to go into law because they weren't all that happy--long hours, and, depending on what kind of lawyer you are, having to defend something you know is morally wrong. I had one co-worker who left the legal field because she felt like she "had to wash the filth off" every night after coming home from work.

I guess if you can handle it, though, you can probably make good coin.
 

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I'm sure I am generalizing here, but I've known several lawyers who all told me not to go into law because they weren't all that happy--long hours, and, depending on what kind of lawyer you are, having to defend something you know is morally wrong. I had one co-worker who left the legal field because she felt like she "had to wash the filth off" every night after coming home from work.

I guess if you can handle it, though, you can probably make good coin.
Same here. I'm also told it's tough in that you have to bill like crazy to in order to hit your quota for the senior person above you, who keeps more of that than you do, who in turn has to pass up even more of it to the one above them, etc. Still, $800/hr makes you think differently about it.
 

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Same here. I'm also told it's tough in that you have to bill like crazy to in order to hit your quota for the senior person above you, who keeps more of that than you do, who in turn has to pass up even more of it to the one above them, etc. Still, $800/hr makes you think differently about it.
rates, billables, firm structure varies widely from practice area to practice area.

The majority of attorneys are, in one form or another, in the area of personal injury and insurance. This is where most of the billable requirement complaints stem from as this is volume work on the defense end, rates are contracted on the understanding that the insurance company will be sending many (hundreds) of cases over the course of a year so the billable rate is artificially lowered. In turn it requires a large amount of work product to be pumped out to make money on volume. Plaintiff's typically work on contingency in this practice area, taking a percentage of the client's settlement/award.

High billing rates are associated with specialty areas, most commonly IP/patent and business related dealings. These rates are based upon geographic location, and experience/reputation. Some criminal Defense lawyers also have high billing rates which again correlates with their reputation/experience.

Family law related practices can also be lucrative but heavily client dependent in the same sense that an entertainment lawyer may make a lot of money but its going to be directly linked to his clientele and contacts.

There are many types of attorneys, there are also many attorneys that are not good at what they do. Most often these are generally bright people who didn't really know what they were in for when they chose their profession and treat it as a job (for one reason or another) as oppose to a career.
 

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Still, $800/hr makes you think differently about it.
Seems like most high paying stuff is that which needs people to successfully draw on multiple areas of serious expertise. Neurologists, for example, who need to understand medicine as well as physics. For a patent, as you know, they usually need to understand the engineering aspects as well as law. I mean, "Teddy Murphy Injury Attorney" types with their own TV jingle probably aren't too worried about finite element analysis or heat cycling. :laugh:
 
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